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Email / Correo electrónico:  saludo@usa.net
Program 2006
2006 Programa
Telephone / Teléfono:  + (52) (55)   5510  9830
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Main page / Página principal

Campamento Diabetes Safari 2008  -  Updated  information  here
 
Objectives
Diabetes education
Diabetes management
Staff
Activities
Schedule and program
Accommodations
Food
Who may attend Campamento Diabetes Safari?
Cost
Registration
Payments, cancelations, and refunds
Clothing and personal items to take
Directions to Campamento Diabetes Safari
Map of site for Campamento Diabetes Safari
Photos of the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec
Photos of Campamento Diabetes Safari 2005

Objectives

Campamento Diabetes Safari provides children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus, type 1, with a setting that is safe, supervised, and designed to offer them support, education, and recreation.  The Campamento provides an educational and recreational experience in which Campers can express themselves, learn to interact cooperatively with others, and function as members of a group.  Many young people do not have opportunities to talk with others who also have diabetes.  At Campamento Diabetes Safari, the presence of other Campers and adult health care professionals who also have diabetes mellitus ensures that the Campers will be able to learn to understand and manage the challenges and experiences that they share as persons with diabetes.  In this way, the children and adolescents increase their practical kowledge about the self-management of diabetes, while the natural beauty of the setting contributes to their intellectual, physical, social, and spiritual growth.

In this process, the Staff offers leadership, experience, and trained supervision, directing its efforts toward the overall goal of Campamento Diabetes Safari, which is to offer a safe, educational, recreational experience to children and adolescents with diabetes.  All of the Staff’s efforts are directed toward this objective.  Campamento Diabetes Safari utilizes the resources of the natural surroundings to contribute to mental, physical, social, and spiritual growth under the supervision of trained and experienced leadership.

Additional objectives are to permit the children and adolescents with diabetes:

Young Campers have the opportunity to increase their independence and self-confidence.  They learn that they are not alone in managing the daily challenges of diabetes mellitus.  They can learn how to have an active lifestyle while taking appropriate care of the condition.  The long tradition of educational, recreational camps for children who have diabetes began in 1925 and has been successful because it successfully addresses their needs for education and safe recreation.  Today there are more than 150 such camps in the USA and Canada; another 150 camps for young people with diabetes are active in other countries.

In most social situations, young people with diabetes are in the minority, often provoking the experience of isolation or separateness.  In contrast, at Campamento Diabetes Safari, they share together with other persons, both young and adult, the daily challenges and triumphs of diabetes care.  Campers have a chance to meet and learn from adults with diabetes who are health care professionals and who have learned to handle situations similar to their own.  The health care professionals share with the Campers methods for handling the challenges and obstacles that diabetes presents.  The overall experience is one of camaraderie and solidarity, rather than of solitude and difference.

During Campamento Diabetes Safari, formal and informal educational opportunities are incorporated in all the activities.  The group context stimulates the dynamic process of shared learning about practical behaviors with immediate and personal relevance.  The Staff assists the Campers in maintaining optimal control of glucose levels and in developing the maturity and autonomy needed to understand and to take charge of the condition in a responsible way.  The benefits of the Campers' personal experience, their dialogue with other persons with diabetes, and the educational and recreational programs are far-reaching and lasting.  In the long run, they may help them to minimize or avoid future problems with their health and the complications of chronic hyperglycemia.

Diabetes education

During the Campamento, children and adolescents almost without exception learn something about diabetes that they did not know before.  All members of Staff take an active role in providing diabetes education to the Campers.  Staff members permit them to learn through personal experience and supervised practice.  The didactic effort is personalized and responds to new situations as they present themselves in the Campers' daily life.  Diabetes education, individually and in small groups, is intermixed with social and recreational activities.

Aware that each person with diabetes is different, the Staff utilizes a variety of methods to convey timely knowledge and techniques suited to each child's age and abilities.  The Campamento creates an environment in which the children and adolescents feel sufficient security, confidence, and supervision to learn and employ effective diabetes management procedures.

Diabetes education teaches the strategies that allow the person with diabetes to maintain blood sugar levels within safe ranges and is the only known way by which to maintain a good quality of life and to postpone or avoid the possible long-term complications of chronic hyperglycemia.  In addition, the Campamento is an excellent forum for learning about and practicing new advances in the management and self-management of diabetes mellitus, type 1.

The anticipated educational topics are always adapted to the interests, ages, and needs for continuing education of the Campers.  Possible themes are varied and include:

Through activities guided by health care professionals, and in a recreational and enjoyable context, the children and adolescents gain the education necessary to be able to control diabetes.  This experience permits them to join with other persons who face similar challenges.

Children and adolescents with diabetes are not likely to return home after only 3 days of Campamento Diabetes Safari totally capable of caring for themselves.  They require time to gain full mastery of the self-management of the condition, which they will learn at the appropriate age and with an individual rhythm that suits them.

Diabetes management

The Staff includes a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals (certified diabetes educators, licensed dietitians, psychologist, nurse), who are trained in the care of young people with diabetes.  The Staff provides medical and dietary supervision, as well as attention to the psychological adaptation necessary for optimal treatment of diabetes.  The health care team also oversees the management of the Campers’ levels of blood glucose, utilizing the cornerstones of diabetes treatment: education, insulin, nutrition, and physical activity.  The multidisciplinary team is present, attentive, and available 24 hours a day during the Campamento.

Under trained supervision, Campers check their blood sugar levels between 4 and 7 times a day, as judged prudent and necessary.  The medical team also provides counseling in how to adjust insulin doses according to food intake, activity level, current level of blood glucose, and the presence of intercurrent illnesses.  Campers learn to rotate the sites of their insulin injections.  The onsite health care team teaches Campers how to recognize and treat the symptoms of hypoglycemia.

The medical team provides first aid for minor accidents and conditions; a physician is available 24 hours a day for medical emergencies.

Menus are designed by the Staff's professional dietitians and prepared with the needs of persons with diabetes in mind.  The professional dietitians guide the Campers in the selection of foods throughout the day, during meals and at snack times.  The recreational activities, chosen and carried out according to an appropriate time of day, are organized and supervised with the help of monitors, who are competent and knowledgeable in the management of diabetes in children and adolescents.

Due to increased physical activity at the Campamento, the health care team may need to adjust a child's usual diabetes management routine.  This could, for example, include increasing the number of carbohydrates or reducing the amount of insulin to compensate for increases in physical activity.  These minor adjustments are typical of all diabetes camps.  They safeguard the Camper’s ability to engage safely in traditional outdoor activities, and they are necessary to avoid diabetes emergencies.

Staff

Dr.  Stan  De Loach, Managing Director of Campamento Diabetes Safari, a citizen of the United States, has worked in México for more than 30 years.  He is a Certified Diabetes Educator and clinical psychologist, with more than 36 years experience in the study, management, and treatment of diabetes mellitus, type 1.  Currently, he lives and works in México, Distrito Federal.  Contact: saludo@usa.net

Carol Gill, RN, Campamento Diabetes Safari Nurse, is a Registered Nurse with experience and special interest in the care and education of persons with diabetes mellitus.  She has previously worked at Campamento Diabetes Safari as part of the medical team.  A citizen of Belize, she currently lives and works in Corozal, Belize, Central America.  Contact: potzal500@hotmail.com

Lic. Nut. Rosa Yáñez, Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator for Campamento Diabetes Safari,has more than 11 years of experience in the management and treatment of diabetes mellitus, type 1.  She has worked as a monitor and Education Coordinator in the campamentos of the Mexican Federation of Diabetes.  A citizen of México, she currently lives and works in México, Distrito Federal.  Contact: rosyanez@hotmail.com

Francisco Vargas, Activities Coordinator and Monitor for Campamento Diabetes Safari, has 6 years experience in the management and treatment of diabetes mellitus, type 1.  He has worked with the Salvadorean Association of Diabetics as a monitor and at Campamento Diabetes Safari as Activities Coordinator.  A citizen of El Salvador, he currently lives in San Salvador and is finishing studies in jurisprudence at the University of El Salvador.  Contact: fravacos@hotmail.com

Gerardo Rodríguez, Cook for Campamento Diabetes Safari 2006, is a citizen of México and prepares healthy, tasty Mexican meals.  He currently resides in México, Distrito Federal, where he is studying a Bachelor's degree in Information Technology.  Contact: sputnick15mx@hotmail.com

Disclosure: No member of the Staff has any significant financial interests or relationships to reveal or disclose with regard to the Campamento.

Staff members have experience and relevant qualifications and act as instructors or leaders in the programmed activities.  With one member of Staff for every 2 or 3 Campers, each child or adolescent receives sufficient personal attention.  Many of the staff (about 60%) also have diabetes and thus can be for the children positive role models of responsibility in the management of diabetes, as well as advisors, caregivers, trainers, and coaches.

Monitors are young people, usually with diabetes, who work with the Campers in order to guide their learning in a sporting or educational activity.  Taking into account the international character of the Campers, Campamento Diabetes Safari is bilingual.  Two languages will be used:  Spanish and English.  The members of the Staff express themselves in one or the other of these languages, or in both.  All members of staff speak either Spanish or English or both.

Activities

All the recreational and educational activities at Campamento Diabetes Safari are designed to respond to the interests and needs of children and adolescents with diabetes.  Educational activities, both organized and informal, are intermixed with recreational experiences.  The educational activities are individualized and usually carried out in small groups of 2 to 6 persons.  Sports and physical activities help to show the beneficial effect of exercise on glucose metabolism.  The activities are scheduled to accommodate the requirements and concerns of persons with diabetes.  Traditional individual and group components of diabetes camps are interspersed with everyday activities such as the selection of sites for insulin injection.  The level and intensity of activities are adapted to the age and previous experience of the participants.

The possible recreational options include: swimming, soccer, basketball, kickball, volley ball, relay races; arts and crafts, painting, flag-making, sculpting, mask-making, wrist bands, games with balloons, ecological activities, paper and plastic recycling; team formation, charades, card games, memory tests, stories and tales, password games, debates, dialogues in confidence, group membership activities, games of challenge and skill; walks, hiking, exploring, Aztec archaeology, starwatching, nature knowledge (flora and fauna); improvisation tournament, team shows, contest and talent night, bonfire...among other possibilites.

Typical schedule and program (program details may vary)
 

     Friday 
5 May 2006
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0800 – 1000 Arrival at the Campamento; welcome and registration (outside main gate of the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec, behind the bus station)
0800 – 1000 Meeting each other; breakfast if necessary; interaction with Staff
1015 – 1115 Instruction in the use of the Optium XCEED blood glucose monitors; supervised monitoring of blood glucose
.  [insulin, snack – as needed]; distribution of t-shirts; sunscreen; take suitcases to the Hotel Zacatepec
1130 – 1210 Settling into the Hotel Zacatecas; morning plenary assembly [Staff introductions; Camp rules; fire drill and safety issues]
1210 – 1225 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
1225 – 1300 Icebreaker; checking out the Centro Vacacional [collective walk or run]
1300 – 1330 Group educational activity: Today's menus [introduction to counting carbs and proteins and their relationship to scheduled activities and 
. insulin]; those who want to swim change into swim suits
1345 – 1400 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose; preprandial insulin
1400 – 1500 Lunch; free time; learning about foods
1500 – 1610 Structured free time: sunscreen, swimming [pool 1]; other physical activity in the area near the pool for those who do not wish to swim
1610 – 1630 Group educational activities
1630 - 1645 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
1700 – 1730 Recreational physical activities
1730 – 1800 Group educational activities
1800 – 1830 Individual educational activities [nighttime monitoring of blood glucose or choice of other topics]
1845 – 1900 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose; preprandial insulin
1900 – 2000 Dinner; free time; learning about foods
2000 – 2100 Evening recreational activities; observation of stars, stories and tales
2115 – 2145 Evening plenary assembly
2145 – 2200 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]; showers (those who wish); to bed
. .
. The schedule and program may be modified according to the interests and needs of the individual group members.
. .
Saturday
6 May 2006
. .
0130 0200 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
0330 0400 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed] for those with previous hypoglycemia at 0130 a.m.
0700 0730 Arise; supervised monitoring of blood glucose [preprandial insulin for those with blood glucose above 150 mg/dL];
. sunscreen; day's t-shirts given out
0730 – 0745 Preprandial insulin for those with blood glucose less than 150 mg/dL
0745 – 0830 Breakfast; free time; learning about foods
0830 – 0915 Morning plenary assembly: dreams and feelings; review of day's menus
0915 – 1015 High-energy group physical activity: River hike / creek peek
1015 – 1030 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
1045 – 1115 Group educational activity: Insulins
1115 – 1215 Structured free time: Drama or comedy
1230 – 1300 Educational activity in small groups: Topics according to wishes and needs of Campers [parents?  school?  brothers and sisters?  parties?]
1300 – 1330 Rest or individual educational activity: Sharing ideas, experiences, feelings related to DM1
1345 1400 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose; preprandial insulin
1400 – 1500 Lunch; free time; learning about foods
1515 – 1530 Group educational activity: What to tell my friends who do not have DM1?
1530 – 1645 Structured supervised free time: sunscreen, swimming [pool 2] or other physical activity; shower
1645 - 1700 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
1700 – 1745 Recreational activities
1745 – 1800 Written thank-you's to individual and corporate donors and sponsors of Campamento Diabetes Safari
1800 – 1830 Individual educational activities: What is diabetes?  Living with diabetes or topics chosen by the Campers
1845 – 1900 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose; preprandial insulin
1900 – 2000 Supper
2000 – 2030 Evening plenary assembly
2030 – 2145 Nighttime recreational activity: Bonfire [silent procession to hotel]
2145 – 2200 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]; showers (those who wish); to bed
. The schedule and program may be modified according to the interests and needs of the individual group members.
. .
    Sunday 
7 May 2006
. .
0130 0200 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
0330 0400 Supervised monitoring of blook glucose [insulin, snack – as needed] for those with previous hypoglycemia at 0130 a.m.
0700 0730 Arise; supervised monitoring of blood glucose [preprandial insulin for those with blood glucose above 150 mg/dL];
. sunscreen; day's t-shirts distributed
0730 – 0745 Preprandial insulin for those with blood glucose less than 150 mg/dL
0745 – 0830 Breakfast; free time; learning about foods
0830 – 0915 Morning plenary assembly: dreams and feelings; review of day's menus
0930 – 1030 High-energy group physical activity
1030 – 1045 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]; sunscreen
1045 – 1145 Structured free time, group phsyical activity: Swimming [Olympic pool] or other physical activity nearby
1145 – 1215 Shower; change clothes; supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack - as needed]
1215 – 1305 Group or individual educational activity
1305 – 1330 Supervised monitoring of blood glucose; preprandial insulin
1330 – 1430 Lunch; free time; recognition of Staff, donors, and sponsors
1445 – 1530 Structured free time; pack bags; gear outside rooms; group photos
1530 – 1545 Walk with bags to Cabaña
1545 1600 Closing of Campamento Diabetes Safari 2006; questions and goodbyes; supervised monitoring of blood glucose [insulin, snack – as needed]
1600 – 1700 Departure from Campamento; return journey home
1700 Formal end of Campamento Diabetes Safari 2006
. .
. The schedule and program may be modified according to the interests and needs of the individual group members.    The time for the formal end of Camp is not subject to change.

Accommodations

The Hotel Zacatepec at the Centro Vacacional, Oaxtepec, Morelos, México, is the official hotel for Campamento Diabetes Safari.  Small groups of 4 to 6 persons of the same gender share a large room that is clean and comfortable.  The rooms for 4 persons have two sets of bunk beds or one set of bunk beds and two single beds.  The rooms for 6 persons have three sets of bunk beds or two sets of bunk beds and two single beds.  Each room has been recently renovated and decorated; in each room, services include electricity, telephone, television, refrigerator, sink with mirror, and private bath (with shower and toilet).  Bath soap, toilet paper, towels, sheets and pillowcases, pillows and blankets are supplied.

Food

Meal choices reflect healthy eating and a balanced food plan.  At mealtimes, the professional dietitians and other Staff members explain to the participants how, when, and how much to eat...and the reasoning behind the choices.  They assure an appropriate intake of food, relating it to the insulin injected, the current blood glucose level, and the amount of physical activity recently completed or foreseen in the following hours.  Staff teaches the principles of sound nutrition, emphasizing foods that maintain healthy bodies and promote optimal blood glucose ranges.

Meals are served family style.  There are three meals and three (or more or fewer, according to what is needed) snacks each day.  The snacks are offered in response to blood glucose levels and therefore are not provided according to rigidly defined numbers or schedules and may not have a fixed, predetermined caloric content.

Working in conjunction with the health care team, the Staff dietitian prepare food plans as necessary and teach Campers how to calculate the nutritional and caloric value of the foods included in their individual food plans.  Two professional cooks prepare the indicated foods according to the current rules for good and healthy eating.

The Staff dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educators, working with the Managing Director, design the menu in order to provide a balanced, varied diet that includes items from the different food groups and that is appealing to the participants.  The food is served at the scheduled time and in quantities sufficient for the needs of young persons with diabetes.  Among the foods offered are: soups, salads, Mexican dishes, tortillas, vegetables, beans, eggs, meat, chicken, hamburgers, milk, yoghurt, non-caloric cold drinks.

The Staff dietitian instructs the participants in how to interpret and incorporate the information contained on food labels in their meal and snack planning and draws special attention to the food labels of items commonly consumed to treat hypoglycemia (glucose tablets, yogurt, meat and cheese, fruit).

The menu planned for Campamento Diabetes Safari 2006 is the following.  Minor changes are possible.  The nutrition facts of the foods served are also available.
 
 
Friday
0800 – 1000  (breakfast)
lowfat or skim milk
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
ham or turkey ham, Oaxaca cheese, reduced-fat mayonnaise, tomato, lettuce
peanut butter
water or sugarfree drink
1200 – 1215 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
1400 – 1500 (lunch)
vegetable soup (with mushrooms, Swiss chard, onion, oats)
green salad (lettuce, cucumber, carrot, avocado)
salad dressing (lemon juice, garlic, olive oil or other)
pan-fried beefsteak
refried black beans
pickled Jalapeño peppers
D'Gari light gelatin with shredded coconut and whipped cream
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
water or sugarfree drink
1645 – 1700 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
1900 – 2000 (dinner)
smoked lentil soup (Campbell’s) with liquid smoke
chicken salad, with hard-boiled egg, chopped onion, and mayonnaise
refried black beans
pico de gallo without chile
lowfat or skim milk
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
Nutella (1 teaspoon)
water or sugarfree drink
(plus possible leftovers from lunch)
2145 – 2200 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
.
Saturday
0100 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
0730 – 0815 (breakfast)
scrambled eggs with cactus leaves
bacon
peanut butter
refried black beans
pico de gallo without chile
pickled Jalapeño peppers
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
lowfat or skim milk
water or sugarfree drink
1015 – 1030 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
1400 – 1500 (lunch)
homemade tomato soup
green salad (lettuce, avocado, cucumber)
salad dressing (lemon juice, garlic, olive oil)
Bacon Bits para la ensalada
smoked pork chops with Manchego cheese
sautéed zucchini squash
refried black beans
pico de gallo, without chile
2 chocolate Milano cookies
water or sugarfree drink
(plus possible leftovers)
1645 – 1700 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
1900 – 2000 (dinner)
hamburger
tomato slices, lettuce
reduced-fat mayonnaise
catsup
mustard
deviled eggs
pico de gallo, without chile
pickled Jalapeño peppers
carrot salad with raisins
refried black beans
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
Nutella (1 tablespoon)
water or sugarfree drink
(plus possible leftovers from lunch)
2145 – 2200 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
.
Sunday
0100
Snack as needed (see list)
0730 – 0815 (breakfast)
lowfat or skim milk
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
bacon and/or pork rind
quesadillas with Oaxaca cheese and ham or turkey ham (corn tortillas)
pico de gallo, without chile
pickled Jalapeño peppers
water or sugarfree drink
1015 – 1030 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)
1330 – 1430 (lunch)
cream of leek soup (with lowfat milk)
tuna and smoked tuna salad with reduced-fat mayonnaise
peanut butter
ham and Manchego cheese rolls with reduced-fat mayonnaise
lettuce, tomato slices, avocado slices
pickled Jalapeño peppers
lowfat or skim milk
D'Gari light gelatin with bananas and whipped cream
3 chocolate kisses
water or sugarfree drink
(plus possible leftovers)
1600 (snack)
Snack as needed (see list)


Foods used for snacks (for prevention or treatment of hypoglycemia)*
avocado
Aztec amaranth cakes, with or without chocolate
crunchy or creamy peanut butter
fresh fruit (limited availability because it is not the best option for the treatment or prevention of hypoglycemia)
glucose tablets (only for initial treatment of hypoglycemia verified by self-monitoring or with neuroglycopenic symptoms)
ham or turkey ham
hard-boiled or deviled egg
light Vitalínea fruit-flavored yoghurt smoothie
lowfat or skim milk
mixed nuts (dry-roasted sunflower seeds, peanuts or other nuts, squash seeds)
Oaxaca, Manchego or other cheeses
Some items must be combined with others in order to provide a complete and adequate snack for the treatment and prevention of hypoglycemia; such snacks should contain CHO, protein, and fat

Who may attend Campamento Diabetes Safari?

Campamento Diabetes Safari is designed to offer opportunities for learning and recreation to any young person with diabetes mellitus, type 1, who is between 6 and 18 years of age (born between 6 May 1988 and 6 May 2000).  Young persons of any nationality, race, gender, political belief, or religion are eligible to attend the Campamento.

Children and adolescents who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, type 1, within the last 12 months, as well as children and adolescents who have never attended a diabetes camp, may find the Campamento to be particularly useful.

Cost

Campamento Diabetes Safari is a non-profit event.  The total cost of registration and attendance at Campamento Diabetes Safari es 2200 Mexican pesos.  The registration costs for the Campamento are the same for all participants and include all applicable taxes.  One U. S. Dollar is equivalent to approximately 10 Mexican pesos.  The total cost in U. S. Dollars is $220.

The total registration cost includes housing for 3 days and 2 nights, meals and snacks, supervised educational and recreational activities, attention of health care professionals, and all materials.

The cost of bus transportation from the Taxqueña bus station in México, Distrito Federal, to the reception area for the Campamento at the entry to the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec, Morelos, is not included in the registration costs.  This transportation costs approximately $6 U. S. Dollars (60 Mexican pesos) one way and $12 U. S. Dollars (120 Mexican pesos) roundtrip.

Because of high standards of care and education, the true cost per participant for the 3 days is almost double the cost of registration and participation.  The support and generosity of sponsors and donors make it possible to charge on $220 U. S. Dollars (2200 Mexican pesos) for registration and participation.  An individual, an organization, or an association, public or private, can sponsor the participation of one or more Campers who are not able to pay the registration fees.

Registration

Applications for membership in the Campamento will be processed in the order in which they are received. Registration ends when the maximum number of Campers have been accepted.  Payment of 50% of the cost of the Campamento (1100 Mexican pesos or 110 U. S. Dollars) must, without exception, accompany the application forms.  The remainder of the cost (1100 Mexican pesos or 110 U. S. Dollars) must, without exception, be received prior to the beginning of the Campamento.  The deadline for receipt of the completed application forms and full payment of the cost of the Campamento is 2 May 2006.

If for any reason a registration is cancelled or withdrawn after it has been received, a nonrefundable administrative cost of 450 Mexican pesos (45 U. S. Dollars) will, without exception, be retained.

All required registration forms are available on the internet here and may be printed, completed, signed, and then sent by mail to the address included on the forms; they may also be copied from the internet and placed in a Word document that is sent as an email attachment  to saludo@usa.net

Payments, cancelations, and refunds
 
Deposit . To reserve a place at the Campamento, a payment of one thousand, one hundred (1100) Mexican pesos or one hundred and ten (110) U. S. Dollars is required for each Camper.  Payment may be by cash, check, or deposit to the Banco HSBC account number given on the registration form.  This payment is not transferrable.
. . .
Final payment . The deadline for full payment of any remaining balance of the full cost of the Campamento is 2 May 2006.  If the total payment of two thousand, two hundred (2200) Mexican pesos or two hundred and twenty (220) U. S. Dollars has not been received by this date, the reservation will be canceled.
. . .
Cancelations & Refunds. . In case of cancelation before 2 April 2006, any payment made will be returned, minus the nonrefundable amount of four hundred and fifty (450) Mexican pesos or forty-five (45) U. S. Dollars, which are retained to cover administrative costs, without exception.

In case of cancelation after 2 April 2006, no refunds will be issued, without exception.

If the Camper cannot complete the Campamento for any reason whatsoever, no refund will be made.

If the emotional, psychological, or behavioral characteristics of the Camper are detrimental to the harmony and appropriate development of the Campamento or if they could be destructive to the Camper himself or herself or to other Campers, the parents (or their alternates) will be contacted and the Camper will be suspended without refund, without exception.

All requests for refund will be processed after 9 May 2006.

Clothing and personal items to take
 
Important - Please don't forget!
  • Persons who use insulin should bring a supply of insulin and syringes sufficient for their personal use during the trips to and from the Camp site
  • Record book with blood glucose values from self-monitoring for the last 7 days
  • Records of last results of glycosylated or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) tests
  • Medicines taken for conditions other than diabetes mellitus
.
Identification of clothing and other personal effects
  • It is essential to mark or label in some durable way all articles of clothing, including footwear, backpacks, and all personal effects brought to Campamento Diabetes Safari, which is not responsible for lost or forgotten articles.  The articles should be clearly marked with first and last names (not solely initials).  Old or inexpensive clothing is recommended.
.
Recommended items
  • Sunscreen (SPF 15 or greater)
  • Tennis or running shoes
  • Baseball cap (with brim for sun protection)
  • Blue jeans
  • Shorts
  • T-shirts or cotton blouses for 1 day (there is no laundry service at the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec); each Camper receives 2 - 3 t-shirts
  • Underwear for 3 days
  • Pajamas 
  • Socks for 3 days
  • Flipflops or sandals (for use indoors and outdoors)
  • Windbreaker or light jacket or sweatshirt or sweater (with long sleeves)
  • Swimming suit
  • Toilet articles (brush or comb, toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, Chapstick, hand lotion) 
  • Backpack or large handbag
  • Plastic bags (for dirty or wet clothing)
  • Writing paper and pen or pencil
  • Insect repellant (non-aerosol)
  • Blood glucose meter, strips, lancing device, lancets, insulin(s), syringes (for personal use during the trips to and from the Camp site)
.
Optional items (according to personal preferences and previous experience)
  • Musical instrument (guitar, flute)
  • Ball (basket, kick, soccer)
  • Favorite stuffed animal or security blanket
  • Camera 
  • Film
  • Pocket flashlight
  • Small change to spend for unforeseen extras
  • Rubber or plastic sheet or waterproof mattress protector (if necessary)
.
Unnecessary or prohibited items and products
  • Knives
  • Pocket knives
  • Hachets
  • Guns
  • Arrows
  • Other objects of violence
  • Felt-tipped permanent markers
  • Cigarettes
  • Matches
  • Tobacco
  • Alcohol
  • Fishing poles
  • Air mattresses
  • Radios
  • Electronic games
  • Cassette players
  • CD players
  • CDs
  • Jewelry or other valuable objects
  • Cell phones and beepers (Phone calls are obstacles to the process of adapting and joining, which are key elements of the learning experience.)
.

Directions to Campamento Diabetes Safari

The housing and other facilities used for Campamento Diabetes Safari are located at the Centro Vacacional del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), located in Oaxtepec, Morelos, México.  Oaxtepec is situated 4,462 feet (1,360 meters) above sea level, 47 miles (75 kilometers) from México City.  The Centro Vacacional is found on the México-Cuautla highway, at Kilometer 27, in the town of Yautepec, in the State of Morelos, México.

The Centro Vacacional is a beautiful tourist complex, with a subtropical climate and abundant trees and flowers.  Its small streams and expansive garden areas are the setting for the modern, recently renovated facilities, which include hotels, cabañas, swimming pools, wading pools, playing fields and courts, a geodesic dome, an Olympic stadium, medical services, and various small supermarkets and stores.

Two first-class bus lines (Estrella Roja and Cristóbal Colón, telephone: + [52] [55]  5544 9008) offer daily, non-stop, direct service, with on-board restroom, from México City to Oaxtepec, every 20 minutes during the day, leaving from the Taxqueña Bus Station (Central de Autobuses Taxqueña) in southern Mexico City, and arriving at the Oaxtepec bus terminal, located at the main entrance to the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec.  Reservations are not required.  A one-way ticket costs 60 Mexican pesos (about $6 U. S. Dollars); a round-trip ticket costs 120 Mexican pesos (about $12 U. S. Dollars).  The one-way trip takes approximately 1½ hours.

Estrella Roja bus line offers daily, direct, first-class service, with on-board restroom, from the city of Puebla (CAPU Terminal) to the Oaxtepec bus terminal, located at the main entrance to the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec.  Departures are once each hour, beginning at 5 a.m.  From Puebla to Oaxtepec, reservations are not required.  A one-way ticket costs 100 Mexican pesos (about $10 U. S. Dollars); a round-trip ticket costs 195 Mexican pesos (about $19 U. S. Dollars).  The one-way trip takes approximately 2¼ hours.  From Oaxtepec to Puebla, a reservation is required, 1½ hours before the desired departure time.  The reservation can be made at the Estrella Roja counter inside the Oaxtepec bus terminal.

Maps and additional information, in English, about Mexico City can be found at http://www.mexicocity.com.mx/mexcity.html.  The same maps and information can be found in Spanish at http://www.mexicocity.com.mx/index.html.

Map of site for Campamento Diabetes Safari (Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec)
 
 

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Photos of the Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec
 

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  Main entrance to the Centro Vacacional
  Overview of lower level of Centro Vacacional
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Geodesic dome
Underneath the geodesic dome
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  Typical dining space for the Campamento
  Typical dining space for the Campamento
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  Olympic swimming pool (at left); wading pool (at right)
  Cold curative sulphur waters (nope, they don't cure diabetes)
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  Outdoor basketball courts
  Room for 6 persons (partial view)
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  Room for 4 persons (partial view)
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Photos of Campamento Diabetes Safari 2005
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